Aging and Age-associated Disease

This research seeks to develop an analytical framework to identify predictive functional relationships between changes in different metabolic parameters during aging. The project is a collaboration with Professor Marta Lipinski, PhD, University of Maryland School of Medicine, and Professor Maureen Kane, PhD at University of Maryland School of Pharmacy.

In a previous, lipidomics-focused, study completed by our collaborators, the lysosomal function in neuronal cells was found to be disrupted after traumatic brain injury, where similar phenomena have been observed in Alzheimer’s disease and age-associated disease. In subsequent research, multiple “omics” data types will be collected and analyzed (e.g., lipidomics, proteomics) to understand the relationship between proteins, lipids, and metabolites in lysosomes, and to construct interaction networks that are associated with aging and age-related diseases. Our lab will use machine learning-based approaches to develop a predictive multi-omics analysis platform. More specifically, we will analyze the functional relationships between the omics parameters and their effects on organellar, cellular, tissue and organismal function.

The ultimate goal is to generate testable hypotheses about mechanisms contributing to aging under normal and disease conditions and the identification of appropriate interventions.

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Renee Ti Chou
PhD Student
Biological Sciences Graduate Program
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Alexis S. Boleda
PhD Student
Biological Sciences Graduate Program